FAQ Cemeteries

DISCLAIMER
Important information concerning the interpretations of legislation and other policies is contained in this page. It is recommended that the Disclaimer be read in conjunction with the information provided.

The cemeteries in Tasmania are subject to the State legislation: Burial and Cremation Act 2002 . This Act makes provision for the establishment and management of crematoria and cemeteries, to provide for, and regulate, the handling and storage of human remains, to amend certain Acts and to repeal the Cremation Act 1934.

In addition, each council is enabled under the Local Government Act 1993 to make a by-law with respect to cemeteries. A cemeteries by-law enables a council to regulate and control the management of cemeteries on land owned by, or under the control of, the council.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
Immediate use of cemeteries:

1. Where are the cemeteries located in this municipal area?

2. What are their operating hours?

3. How do I buy a cemetery plot?

4. How do I obtain a permit for burial?

5. Where can I place ashes?

6. What is an exhumation?

7. How do I obtain a permit for exhumation?

8. What is a burial on private land?

9. Are you needing help after someone has died?

 

Research and other uses:

10. How do I find out where someone is buried?

11. Who do I contact for records of burials for genealogical and historical purposes?


1. Where are the cemeteries located in this municipal area?

Waratah-Wynyard Council maintains cemeteries at Somerset, Yolla, Mount Hicks, Flowerdale, Waratah and Wynyard. However, only the Waratah and Wynyard Lawn cemeteries are still in use unless there is a prior reservation for one of the other cemeteries. (Back to FAQ List)

2. What are their operating hours?

Cemeteries in the Waratah-Wynyard municipal area do not have strict operating hours. (Back to FAQ List)

3. How do I buy a cemetery plot?

In Waratah-Wynyard, cemetery plots cannot be purchased in advance but are allocated when a funeral director makes application for a burial to take place. It is possible for up to three interments to be made in a single plot (dependent upon depth of initial interment), which effectively accommodates the need for reservations that can eventually be used by other members of the family of the person first interred. (Back to FAQ List)

4. How do I obtain a permit for burial?

Permits are obtained through funeral directors. (Back to FAQ List)

5. Where can I place ashes?

If cremation is chosen over burial, there are choices in where the ashes are then placed. Popular options are:

  • scattering in a garden or some other preferred spot
  • preservation in a decorative urn and kept at home
  • taken to a cemetery for burial in a small plot or placement in a columbarium.

Ashes are not classified as "human remains" in the Burial and Cremation Act 2002 . Therefore there are no stated restrictions with regard to their disposal. However, as with burials, should you wish to inter ashes in a cemetery, please contact the Cemetery Manager. (Back to FAQ List)

6. What is an exhumation?

Exhumation is the act of digging up a body for the purpose of reburial or for medical investigation.

If for the purpose of a medical investigation, the Chief Magistrate will order an exhumation under the Coroners Act 1995 . (Back to FAQ List)

7. How do I obtain a permit for exhumation?

If you wish to exhume the body of a relative for cremation or reburial in another location you will need authorisation form the Director of Public Health. (Back to FAQ List)

8. What is a burial on private land?

A burial on private land is a burial other than in a cemetery. If you wish to organise this written permission must be obtained by the landholder and the general manager of the relevant local council. Approval must also be sought from the Director of Public Health. The provisions covering burials on privately owned land are contained in section 41 of the Burial and Cremation Act 2002. (Back to FAQ List)

9. Are you needing help after someone has died?

Whether a death is anticipated or unexpected, it forces us to deal with complex emotions and decisions during a difficult time. If you are needing help in this area Centrelink has a helpful online publication entitled 'Are you needing help after someone has died?' which may be of assistance. The Australian Funeral Directors Association also has information which can provide support at this time. (Back to FAQ List)

10. How do I find out where someone is buried?

Contact can be made with the relevant cemetery manager on (03) 6443 8333. (Back to FAQ List)

11. Who do I contact for records of burials for genealogical and historical purposes?

The State Library of Tasmania has microfiche copies of the Tombstone and Memorial Inscriptions of Tasmania (TAMIOT), an index containing over 110,000 entries from 788 locations within Tasmania. To find out which branches house the index see the library's web site .

The Tasmanian Family History Society also maintains various cemetery records, including TAMIOT, as well as having many other publications to assist with historical research. (Back to FAQ List)

Waratah Wynyard Council
21 Saunders Street : PO Box 168, Wynyard TAS 7325
Phone (03) 6443 8333 : Fax (03) 6443 8383 : Email: council@warwyn.tas.gov.au
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